Multivocal Ministry –

My work focuses on helping individuals and groups gain clarity and perspective on where they are, where they want to be, and then designing a path forward. From there, I accompany clients on their journey, supporting and refining the goals, strategies and paths as the situation changes. Wherever you are on life’s journey, you don’t have to travel alone.

And since my practice of ministry is MultiVocal, You’ll usually find me in one of these places…

SL Trinity Circle Synchronous LifeSynchronous Life

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Institute for Vital Ministry


Missional Wisdom


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Vitality Coaching for
Congregations at



ucclogoInterim Minister at
St Pauls E & R

Church (UCC)

My ministry vocation finds is full expression through a variety of channels. These six are the primary ways that I seek to live out God’s call on my life, which is to support leaders in their pursuit of personal wholeness in the midst of transformative and world changing work.

Life is complex and filled with competing claims on our time, the only truly limited resource in life. My goal is to help clients integrate the energies in each area of life so that the physical and spiritual, emotional and relational, intellectual and occupational expressions of life lead to harmony and vitality rather than competing and thus depleting the very essence of life as it could be lived.

For more information or to schedule an appointment, please fill out the contact form below.

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Glossary: Multivocal


       the voice with which our life speaks good things into existence in the world.


       the experience of having multiple expressions of vocation


Multivocal    adj.   

– prefix “multi-” from Latin multus – much, many
– root “vocal” from Latin vocalis, equivalent to voc (stem of vox) – voice, or ‘to speak’

Multivocal is an adjective identifying a condition of having multiple vocations – literally – “speaking with multiple voices”.


This is rooted in the following understanding of “vocation”:

     Vocation is –
the voice with which our life speaks good things into existence in the world.

This understanding draws on the creation stories found in Genesis 1-3. Within these narratives we hear that:

  1. Through speech, God creates
  2. What God creates in this way is good
  3. Among these created things are humankind
  4. Humankind are made “in [God’s] image and likeness, both male and female”

I would argue then that part of the imago dei (image of God) in us is this power/ ability/ responsibility to create good things through the voice of our lives.

It is readily apparent within human relationships that our words matter – they have the power to create both good and bad things in ourselves, other people, and the world around us. We literally have the ability to speak blessings and curses – as we see clearly in the story of Isaac, Rebekah, and their sons Jacob and Esau (Genesis 27).

Vocation is the way this power is manifest, not only through our spoken words, but in all that we put into the world, whether through words, actions, or the simple energy of our presence or absence in a place.

“Multivocal” acknowledges that we do not speak or act in only one way, but in fact our lives create many things across the six domains of human flourishing – spiritual, physical, emotional, relational, intellectual and occupational.

In relationships, I have a vocation as a husband, a father to both a daughter and a son, a sibling, a son to my parents, a friends, a colleague, a pastor, a neighbor, etc. In each of these I hope to be consistently “the same person” though I need to relate to people differently depending on which relationship I’m in. The clearest example for me is this: If I relate to anyone else the way I relate to my wife, we are all in really big trouble. Either I’m not treating her in the unique way that our relationship deserves (treating her just like I would a neighbor or stranger) or I’m being far too familiar with other people (engaging a kind of intimacy that I believe only belongs to her). Our word “personality” grows out of the ancient understanding within both Greek and Roman society illustrated in their theatre, where the “persona” was the theatre mask worn by an actor playing multiple roles – first the king, then the beggar, now the soldier. Each role requires a different voice, both literally and figuratively.

Multivocal has a second meaning beyond this broadest application of the various aspects of life in which we use different voices. In regard to occupations, I believe that individuals and organizations can appropriately embrace and live into multiple vocations. A person can be both an accountant and a painter, for instance. Both of these are vocations, and they seem rather disconnected from each other in spirit and practice. Yet one person may embody them both. And for that person to be healthy, to flourish and thrive, it is best for the energy of these vocations to provide mutual benefit.  Rather than seeing numbers and colors in conflict, rather than experiencing the precision of spreadsheets contradicting the freedom of abstract expressionism, perhaps these opposite energies can serve one another, through balance and contrast that highlights the value and beauty of both. There is a reason that we are drawn to contrasting flavors like salty/sweet or sweet/sour. Through contrast, seemingly opposing experiences actually complement and enhance the unique

Contrary to the wisdom offered by Curly (Jack Palance) in City Slickers

the pursuit of flourishing in an individual or organizational life is therefore not about trying to identify the “ONE THING” that will bring meaning and purpose. It is rather more reasonable and ultimately satisfying to recognize, celebrate and express multiple vocations with gratitude and joy. When there is just one thing, it is in the meta-narrative, the overarching theme that threads through all of the individual and particular expressions of vocation. A Christian might say, “My one thing is to follow Jesus.” People of many religious traditions might say, “to glorify God,” or, “to become one with God.” Others might say, “to become fully myself,” or, “to alleviate suffering and promote flourishing.” These are good aspirations, but until they find expression in the particular, they lack any concrete meaning. And it is in the particulars that a multivocal life finds its greatest realization.

The questions for us all then are these:

What good things do you want your life to speak into existence in the world, across all six domains of your life, so that you can flourish, so that your life can fulfill its purpose? And then, what specifically will you do to move toward those goals?

Here’s a resource you might consider using as you explore these questions.


  1. I will do better. Listening across difference. Leave a reply
  2. More to come… Leave a reply
  3. Pressing forward toward the goal Leave a reply
  4. 911 – A Litany of Remembrance Leave a reply